Ask Bedel

Jan 19, 2020

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Welcome to #AskBedel, a weekly personal-wealth Q&A where you can ask financial planning and investment experts for advice. Each week we’ll be answering your personal finance questions, so be sure to submit your questions to Bedel@BedelFinancial.com, or click on Submit a Question below.

1. I planned to purchase medical insurance off the Marketplace, but I have been hearing about insurance options from religious groups. Which is better? Will I still get the same amount of coverage?

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Some organizations have formed non-profit groups for the sole purpose of sharing medical expenses. Member’s healthcare expenses are pooled and shared among everyone. If the group has relatively low health expenses, everyone benefits. Premiums are generally lower than typical healthcare insurance premiums. However, they function very differently than a traditional insurance company. One of the biggest differences is that they may not pay all of your claims. Factors such as lifestyle or preexisting conditions determine if costs are eligible to be covered. In many states, they are not held to the same regulations that insurance companies must abide by which means if you aren’t happy, there isn’t much the state can do to help you. Many hospitals and healthcare agencies don’t recognize medical cost sharing as insurance. This could impact your ability to be treated. Purchasing insurance is about transferring risk from yourself to the insurance company. You want to ensure that your insurance coverage will be there to support you when you need it.

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3. I recently inherited a large sum of money and I have been thinking about buying a rental property. What are some of the things I need to consider?

The amount of the inheritance can, and should, impact your decision when considering the acquisition of a rental property. However, before making any purchase, make sure you consider your entire financial picture. Revolving debts or liabilities that carry high-interest rates should be paid off prior to any purchase/investment. From there, make sure your emergency fund is sufficiently funded to cover 3-6 months’ worth of expenses. Once those items are taken care of, you can then begin to evaluate the possibility of purchasing a rental property.

As with any investment, you need to exercise due diligence when acquiring property. Rental properties can provide a steady stream of passive income and a slew of deductible expenses. They can complement and provide your existing portfolio with a level of diversification. Upon the sale of the property, it stands to reason you will benefit from the property’s growth in value over the duration in which you own the property. Also, if you find another property with potentially stronger growth prospects, the IRS allows a 1031 exchange, which enables you to sell a property and invest in another like property without paying capital gains taxes.

Conversely, there are also drawbacks to contemplate. If liquidity is a concern, a rental may not be a wise decision as it can take time to sell a property. Opportunity costs should also be considered. Do you feel the return on the property can sufficiently outperform other investment options? What is your desire to be a landlord? Rental homes often have maintenance issues that can occur at any moment. Are you handy enough to handle repairs yourself, or will you need to bring in your local handyman for upkeep? Lastly, pay attention to local taxes and insurance premiums. While you may initially establish what you feel is a desirable rent structure based on the mortgage of the property (if you don’t pay for it in cash), rising taxes and insurance can erode your profit margin faster than you can increase rent.

When making a decision such as this, it’s best to work with your financial advisor and a local real estate agent. Your financial advisor can help you understand the impacts of such a purchase and offer possible alternatives while your agent can help you navigate the area in which you intend to buy. Though rental properties can be a lot of work, they can also provide for a nice return on your investment, so do your homework before jumping in!

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2. My family member recently passed away and I inherited their estate. Will I owe taxes on my inheritance?

It’s very unlikely, but it depends. There are three possible taxes involved. The first is estate tax, which is levied at the federal level. If the value of your family member’s estate is under the lifetime exclusion ($11.4M in 2019) then you’re in the clear. If their estate is above the exclusion amount, your inheritance may be reduced by the amount of estate tax owed; however, the tax won’t be paid out of your pocket.

The second possible tax is charged at the state-level. There are six states that still charge inheritance taxes on the person receiving the inheritance. Check the rules for the state in which your family member lived and owned property.

Lastly, some assets have capital gain tax or ordinary income tax implications. For example, if you inherit shares of a stock you will owe capital gain tax if you sell the stocks at a gain. If you inherit an IRA you will owe ordinary income tax on the Required Minimum Distributions and other withdrawals.

Taxes can get confusing. Consult with a tax professional if you’re still not sure whether you will owe Uncle Sam.

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Prior to implementing any investment strategy referenced in this article, either directly or indirectly, please discuss with your investment advisor to determine its applicability. Any corresponding discussion with a Bedel Financial Consulting, Inc. associate pertaining to this article does not serve as personalized investment advice and should not be considered as such.